Tag Archives: black-eyed peas

Super-food Stews

Black-eyed Peas, Carrot & Collards in Smoked Paprika Sauce, over brown rice (here pictured w/ Sriracha hot sauce on top). A super-food one-pot meal.

Black-eyed Peas, Carrot & Collards in Smoked Paprika Sauce. Served this very simple hearty stew on Fri night for 70 folks; and it’s on the lesson plan for 2 “Super Food” cooking classes this week.

Taking advantage of seasonal veg, it’s a very “clean” yet intensely flavored, toothsome one-pot meal that is vegan, gluten-free, low-fat and low-glycemic, high-fiber and nutrient-dense. Plus, your day’s Vit A and more.

Here’s the Recipe. This is technically a ‘cassoulet’, ie a braised dish with broth. Serve over brown rice or other whole grain, with hot sauce on side.

Making this for a family quantity, say 2-3 quarts, it’d take less than an hour esp with canned Black-eyed Peas. I used farm-fresh veggies from the market, of course, but, flash-frozen will do too, and would shave off another 15 min of prep time.

Btw, Black-eyed Peas have 6g protein per half-cup, in top 4 of legumes (winners are kidney beans & soybeans). Don’t have black-eyed peas? Fine — use any canned beans or lentils. (Search this blog for more posts about BEP, my favorite neglected step-child bean.)

Of course, this is a perfect autumn vegetarian entree. It would also be terrific with a small amount of chicken, pork, kielbasa, or turkey brats, and yes, left-over bacon. Sweet potatoes, potatoes, or squash as well but, refrain from making this into a carb-fest (ie increasing glycemic load). Keep a high veg to carb ratio.

More nutritional info:

 

  • 1 cp cooked sliced carrots contains 54 cal, 4.7 g fiber, 1.2 g protein, 5.4 g sugars, 537% RDI vit A, 9.4% RDI Vit C, 4.7%  calcium, 5.5% folate, 2.9%  iron, 26% Vit K.

 Estimated glycemic load = 2 (of 100/day target).
  • 1 cp cooked collards has 49 cal, 5.3 g fiber (10% RDA), 2 g protein, 308% RDI vit A, 58%  Vit C, 27% calcium, 44%  folate, 12% iron and 1045% Vit K. Estimated glycemic load = 4 (of 100/day target).
  • 1 cp canned black-eyed peas has 160 kcal, 6 g protein, 34 g carb, 8 g fiber, and notably, 6.7% RDI iron and 15% folate. Estimated glycemic load = 20 (of 100/day target).

    [RDI = Recommended Daily Intake]

 Some of my coaching clients are trying low-carb regimens. Ok, then skip the grains, not the beans.Beans are the best kind of complex carbs AND provide serious protein, so do NOT omit. You’ll just get hungry sooner if you do.

Scroll the Recipe page for more Super-food recipes!

 

Guests with Dietary Restrictions? Don’t Fret!

As much as I love to write — and read my own writing — I haven’t been blogging. Why? Mainly because I’ve been keeping very busy lately and all the updates pile up in my head. Besides the Delivered Dish of the Week service, I’ve been catering and teaching cooking to small groups. A few of these intimate lessons are gift certificates I donated to favorite charity auctions, including that of Mixed Blood Theater and Feline Rescue. [See previous posts about lessons.]

Like October’s spate of catering [see 2 posts ago], this past week’s catering gigs ran the gamut in scope, from a small dinner to a 150-person buffet dinner at a charity event. Yep, the same week. The common thread of these two meals was using seasonal vegetables — cabbage/greens and root vegetables — and offering easy options for omnivores, vegans and gluten-free & dairy-free diners.

Designing and cooking such a meal is NOT HARD. It’s not even “outside the box”. The typical ‘meat & potato” meal, in fact, meets both gluten and dairy restrictions!

New red and purple potatoes!

Meat + potato + vegetable. None of these contain dairy or wheat gluten. Right? Some traditional side dishes do have cheese and/or wheat, so either pick ones that don’t, or just add a couple alternatives. For example, steamed green beans tossed with olive oil & lemon juice instead of baked in a creamy casserole. This happens to be much easier to cook, as well.

My menu for the small dinner for 10 started with appetizers of crackers & raw veg tray with hummus (has no dairy), cheese and shrimp cocktail. The main dishes were a lean pork pot roast flavored with red wine, thyme & sage, a lentil & carrot stew, sweet & sour sauteed brussel sprouts, tossed salad, brown rice and bread. The simple addition of a quick lentil stew to a “meat & potato” type of meal provided a vegetarian + no gluten + no dairy option as well as a great accompaniment to juicy pot roast. 90% of this meal is gluten- and dairy-free, and yet, it is both familiar and fairly easy to make.

And, it turned out that, unbeknownst to me or the host, one guest does not take cow’s milk and another eats gluten-free. So, you just never know!

For the large charity event, I knew there would be some guests with various dietary requirements. I chose a menu of lightened “soul food” dishes that are high in whole grains, beans & veg, and low in fat (no pork). Cholesterol-lowering AND inexpensive, yay!  The main hot dishes of paprika chicken, black-eyed pea stew, brown rice and braised collard greens were gluten- and dairy-free. We provided regular and gluten-free cornbread and crackers, and both chocolate cake and baked apples for dessert.The result was a hearty, not ‘heavy’, cold weather dinner that everybody, including vegan, gluten-free, dairy-free and diabetic diners, enjoyed.

By ‘we” I mean me and a team of great volunteers who chopped, roasted, boiled & braised heaps of fresh vegetables from the farmers’ market. Slow food on that scale requires many hands, sharp knives and a lot of extra-large pots & pans. Volunteers require supervision and large amounts of chocolate toffee almonds and praise. I love you, volunteers!

Sage Advice: more fresh food, less effort

As a cooking coach, I focus on efficiency, versatility and making use of seasonal foods. The most recent sessions feature black-eyed peas & Swiss chard prepared SIX ways, five of which can be frozen.

Beans and Dark Leafy Greens such as chard are a wonderful combination that happens to be easy, versatile and extremely nutritious (and low-fat).  I could use kale or turnip greens in the following recipes just as easily as chard, and I do.

Dark Leafy Greens! from top: dinosaur kale (Lacinato), red onion, collards, turnip green, red radish.

Sadly I find many people do not know what to do with Chard or Kale, they mistakenly overcook Collards, they keep beets but throw OUT Beet Greens (gasp!) and, they’ve never even heard of Turnip Greens. Aiyeee!

Just like spinach, these greens are LOVELY when simply sauteed with garlic, lemon & salt. Unlike spinach, all these greens are bountiful from now til Nov.

Black-eyed peas (BEP) is a stand-in for any creamy mild bean. I like it because it’s fast-cooking and under-used.

6 dishes you can easily make from these 2 main ingredients, even in ONE afternoon. All basically vegan.

#1 Marinated BEP Salad with diced chard stems and leaves, any crunchy veg on hand, tossed w/ herb vinaigrette.

#2 BEP & Leafy Green Saute Base. A simple saute of chopped chard leaves & stems, garlic & onion and cooked BEP in a generous amount of olive oil. Zucchini is also nice in this base. It should be wet enough to clump together but not overly goopy. This mixture is divided into 3+ quarts to be seasoned separately; a quart or more of plain is frozen too.

#3 A la Provencal. Add fresh herbs like sage, lemon juice, and, if you like, green olives and/or capers.

Sage & Smashed Black-eyed Peas & Chard Bruschetta

Smashed Black-eyed Peas & Chard Bruschetta with Fresh Sage

#4 Provencal Bruschetta, sandwich or omelette filling: #3 smashed, drizzled with EVOO and topped with minced fresh sage & garlic. And diced fresh tomatoes if got ’em.

#5 Provencal Stew and Soup. Broth & wine added to #3 along with more veg (any kind), more herbs or pesto, then simmered til soft. Throw some pesto or grated cheese on top before serving.

#6 Curry Stew. #2 base simmered with more veg, chopped tomatoes, tomato paste, broth and Indian spices such as garam masala or curry powder (and many more which I won’t list now), cayenne if you like it spicy. Yogurt and raisins is nice as garnish.

#7 Spaghetti Sauce. #2 simmered with with tomato sauce and paste, basil, oregano.

If you have 3 large pots, you can do this is in one session. All but the salad can be frozen. Easy, versatile, yummy!

DDoW Club — Bring on the Potlucks!

Summer Potluck Season is upon us! With that in mind, here are the next 3-4 weeks of the Delivered Dish of the Week Club. 1 qt is enough for a 10-12 person potluck (1/3 cp each). If a bigger event, order more!

Also, you’ll start to see more locally grown veg in salads, as they become plentiful at farmers’ markets. Hopefully, radishes will appear soon.  MARKET ALERT: Local Strawberries are here!

NEXT WEEK: JUNE 6 -12

1) Sesame Soba & Whole Wheat Noodle Salad. Vegan. Noodles, some shredded veg and a creamy tahini “Annie’s Goddess” type dressing. Pls notify early if you would like all-soba noodles, ie no gluten.

Thai Green Beans (photo by Brad Dahlgaard)

2) Thai Green Beans. Vegan. Eat hot or cold. I’ll put crushed peanuts in a separate baggie.

JUNE 13-19

1) Rum-flavored Baked Beans. Vegan. Dark and rich-tasting thanks to the rum & molasses sauce. A big hit at a catered BBQ. Serve hot in a crockpot; although I think it would be fine at room temperature, too.

2)  Herb Pesto Potato Salad. Vegan. Will include some crunchy veggies. No mayo —  it can sit out on the picnic table all day!

JUNE 20-26

1) Black-eyed Peas Salad in Cilantro Tamarind dressing. Vegan.

2) Kasha Pilaf with Toasted Walnuts and Scallions. Vegan. Kasha is a popular name for buckwheat groats, ie unhulled unprocessed grains. Nicely nutty. Buckwheat is misnamed and contains no gluten.

JUNE 27- JULY 3
Let others bring the white & blue while you bring the RED
.

1) Roast Beet & Lentil Salad in Balsamic. Vegan. A very popular and incredibly beautiful dish. People who think they don’t like beets are usually won over.

Fireworks Salad (red rice & veg). Vegan, no gluten!

2) Red Rice & Crunchy Veg Salad with Cranberries. Vegan. By this time there should be fresh green peas, radishes, daikon and corn at the market? Then I’ll call it Fireworks Salad.

Click here to learn more about Delivered Dish of the Week Club, its terms and fees. To sign up for the Club and to place orders, just contact me with your name and address for delivery, and I’ll get back to you right away.