Tag Archives: celeriac

Celeriac, the “Vegetable World’s Ugly Duckling”

Celery stalks and bulbs, known as celeriac

This week’s dishes include Roast Cauliflower & Celeriac with a Ginger Carrot sauce. What’s celeriac?

“Greet celeriac, the unsung frog prince of winter vegetables. Pare off its warty exterior and you’ll uncover the royal vegetable within: a perfect, ivory-fleshed, winter alternative to potatoes and other starches. Celeriac — also known as celery root, knob celery and turnip-rooted celery — is cousin to anise, carrots, parsley and parsnips. When peeled, celery root’s creamy white flesh resembles that of a turnip and tastes like a subtle blend of celery and parsley. Additionally, half a cup contains only 30 calories, no fat and provides an excellent source of dietary fiber. ” (Lifted from article on NPR.org, “The Vegetable World’s Ugly Duckling” by Jack Staub.)

NutritionData.com lists 1 cup of boiled celeriac as having 42 kcal, 1.5 g protein, 9 g carbs, 2 g fiber. It’s also low on the glycemic index.

OK, 60 cal or 42 cal, what ev. It tastes lovely.  You may have had it pureed like mashed potatoes or in soup. Roasting is easier, and, as you know, I am a huge fan of roasting veg.

It’s a late fall & winter crop, like other root veg, so no, you cannot find them in stores now. Those of you who get CSA shares will remember these pale ‘warty bulbs’ standing out in your boxes of familiar hard squash and beets. Fortunately, my new organic wholesale source allows me to offer out-of-season items like this.

 

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Menus for March

Starting later this month, I will have a source of reasonably priced, bulk organic produce so I can offer more lovely vegetables in the off-season. Yay!  Wish I had found this in December, but, oh well.

If you’ve been paying attention, you may have noticed that I typically do not use processed grain products except for the very occasional noodle dish; this includes couscous, pasta, etc.  I’m all about whole grains. And, most people cook those regularly, so I don’t offer it. However, I could if enough requests come in. So let me know.

MAR 14 – 20

1)  Indonesian Tempeh with Green Beans, Cauliflower and Crushed Peanuts. Vegan, gluten-free. Chunks of marinated tempeh (a nutty-tastying soy bean product, similar to a firm veggie burger in texture) and veg in a gingery peanut sauce. May have a little kick; have your own chili sauce at the ready. This artisan tempeh is from a local supplier, made with love. Suggest accompaniment of brown rice or potatoes.

2) Crunchy Cabbage & Noodle Salad. Vegan, gluten-free. Julienned cabbage, carrots, bamboo shoots, daikon and rice noodles in a mint & rice vinegar dressing. A good tangy contrast with peanutty tempeh. Serve cold/room temp.

Lemony Quinoa w/ Zucchini & Raisins, Italian Black Bean Salad w/ Green Olives & Almonds

MAR 21 – 27

1) Black Bean Salad with Green Olive & Almonds in Citrus Vinaigrette. Vegan, gluten-free. Some crunchy veg will add more textures to this substantial room-temp salad. I think the black beans will stand up to this mouthwatering relish found in “America’s Test Kitchen” mag.

2)  Lemony Quinoa with Zucchini & Raisins. Vegan & gluten-free. A more delicately flavored dish to eat hot or room temp.

MAR 28 – APR 3

1)  White Bean Cassoulet with Broccoli & Sun-dried Tomato. Vegan, gluten-free. Cassoulets are quickly braised brothy stews that you spoon over a whole grain like barley, brown rice or couscous or eat with crusty bread.  You could also serve with a compact pasta, like macaroni, orecchiete, orzo. You often see this robust Mediterranean combo (without beans) on restaurant menus.

2)  Ensaladilla. Vegan, gluten-free. Also called Russian Salad, this combines cooked potatoes, carrots and green beans with pickles and capers in garlic mayonnaise. I’m going to use a vinaigrette instead of mayo.

APR 4 – 10

1)  Curried Barley Salad with Peas, Cranberries & Coconut. Vegan. Many clients’ favorite and mine too. Great chewy texture, satisfying and low-fat.

2) Roast Cauliflower & Celeriac with Ginger Carrot Sauce. Vegan & gluten-free. This sauce, like the soup, is easy and lovely. Make a big batch sometime and freeze.